iPads improve learning and increase progress

Good Practice at Upton:

Progress at Upton

There is extensive evidence that using modern technology helps them make greater progress:

Our Year 8 in 2014 without iPads achieved an average level of 5b, whereas our Year 8 with iPads in 2015 achieved an average level of 6c. Both Year groups started year 7 at the same point, with an average level of 4a.

They enjoy learning through technology, and so are more motivated and find it easier to concentrate, collaborate and communicate. It has had a positive impact on attendance.

Slide09

See the iPad bumper edition posted on 19/1/15

https://uptonteep.wordpress.com/2015/01/19/ipad-bumper-edition/

iPad launch to Year 6 Parentsupton

We launched the iPad scheme to Year 6 parents on Wednesday 18th March 2015. Please have a look at the video produced by the student E-learning Facilitators (ELFs) and click on the PDF version of the PowerPoint used below.

Video:

Parents presentation

 

Brain food

Scotland

Tablets allow for freedom and flexible learning, study finds. Students become more creative and independent when given their own tablet computer, according to a study on tscotlandhe use of mobile technology in Edinburgh schools. The research appears to bolster the case for moving away from fixed computers and dedicated information communications technology rooms towards providing all students with a tablet or mini-laptop for use throughout school and at home, known as “1:1 mobile learning”.

Students showed more enthusiasm for school after mobile digital devices were introduced – mostly in 2012-13 – in two primaries and two secondaries in Edinburgh, according to University of Hull researchers Kevin Burden and Trevor Male. Students had already been more likely to use mobile technology than school ICT even before it was sanctioned: more students regularly used mobile devices such as smartphones in school (35 per cent) than school computers (25 per cent). But their use of technology in school “increased significantly” during the 1:1 projects at Sciennes and Broomhouse primary schools and Forrester and Gracemount high schools, the research states.The allocation of personal tablets or mini-laptops “alleviates many of the problems and complaints which teachers have traditionally made about using fixed technologies in the standard IT laboratory”, Dr Burden and Dr Male write.

“There is evidence that teachers are shifting their practices in ways which might prove to be very significant,” the report states. “Personal access to the internet enables teachers to set more authentic and realistic tasks for students,” it adds.

Student autonomy was “an immediate benefit”, particularly at Sciennes Primary, where children were given considerable freedom to personalise iPads. Parents were also enthusiastic, with many buying tablets for their children on the strength of the study. One Sciennes parent said: “It has definitely helped him to be more independent; his creative writing is now that of a child way beyond his years as he is not held back by the slowness of pencil and paper.” But problems were identified: teachers found it difficult to support simultaneous use of different types of devices, so the report recommends that schools choose only one. Questions were also raised about the ability of Glow, the digital network for Scottish schools, to support the technology. And there is growing concern among parents – although less so among teachers – about internet addiction and overuse of games. Edinburgh already has about 6,500 iPads in its schools to share among the city’s 44,000 students. The council has promised to match-fund any money that secondary schools put towards providing entire year groups with iPads over the next two years. “We are quite convinced that it’s the way forward,” said senior education manager Karen Prophet. “What’s been fascinating is that this technology has not been stolen or damaged, because young people value it.”Ken Cunningham, general secretary of School Leaders Scotland said that, given that tablets were expensive and required a reliable broadband connection, it would be a long time before each student in Scotland could be equipped with one. However, he said the fact that “not everybody can get (one)” was not an excuse to delay their introduction: it was simply a case of being “sensible” in targeting the initiative. He suggested that tablets might be used to help narrow the attainment gap in Scotland, with struggling students given them first. (See the full report by clicking on the link below).

Scotland-iPad-Evaluation

The USA

iPad changes the way teachers teach and students learn. Students, educators, and institutions are using iPad for countless educational purposes and finding both anticipated and surprising benefits. Examples in this document highlight the following areas across K–12 and higher education: • Improvements in academic performance • Increases in engagement and motivation • Added instructional flexibility and resource efficiency • Integrated focus on content quality and design (See the full report by clicking on the link below)

iPad_in_Education_Results

 England

Study Finds Benefits in Use of iPad as an Educational Tool. The study looks at the use of iPads at the Longfield Academy, where a large scale 1 to 1 iPad program was implemented last year. A brief overview of this groundbreaking study is provided below.

http://www.emergingedtech.com/2012/07/study-finds-benefits-in-use-of-ipad-as-educational-tool/

The iPad as a Tool for Education – Naace report supported by 9ine Consulting (2)

It is not just at Upton: Article of the week

The Positive Impact of Launching a 1-1 iPad Project – The Data from Hove Park School Park

In April 2013 Hove Park School launched a 1-1 iPad deployment for 1600 students. What has been the impact on progress, behaviour and attitudes to learning?

Student Achievement

Evidence based on the tracking of achievement data shows that the introduction of Hove Park’s 1-1 iPad Learning Transformation Project has made a positive contribution to the school’s work to eliminate the gap between the progress of economically disadvantaged students and their peers. Since the introduction of iPads 1-1 the progress of students eligible for pupil premium funding has accelerated compared to the progress of the cohort as a whole.

Student AchievementStudent Behaviour

Analysis of behaviour data at Hove Park has shown that the use of iPads has resulted in a significant decrease in sanctions across the school for the first two terms working 1-1 compared with the same period in 2012. Most tellingly, the sanctions received by the pupil premium cohort of economically disadvantaged students has decreased at a faster rate over the same period.

Other Indicators

 

Hove Park used pupil premium funding to provide eligible students with iPads and a suite of educational apps. These early results show that working 1-1 with iPads has had a clear and positive impact on these students who are now engaging with learning better and achieving at a faster rate.

Student Perceptions Of Learning

In order to gauge the initial feedback from students, the school asked 500 students at Hove Park to evaluate the quality of different aspects of their work before the introduction of iPads and again after 10 weeks of working with an iPad in lessons. In measuring the proportion grading the quality of work good or outstanding in a 4-point response scale, the results were extremely encouraging.

Enjoyment of lessons
Before students had an iPad only 4.7% of students rated the enjoyment of lessons as excellent. Now students have an iPad 47.8% of students rate their lesson enjoyment as excellent. 86.9% of students rate the enjoyment of lessons as good or excellent compared to 31% of students before they had an iPad.

Learning in Groups
Before students were using iPads 61.2% rated learning in groups as good or excellent, compared to 79.6% now.

Support from Peers
There were 58.1% of students who rated the support from friends as good or excellent before they had an iPad, compared to 67.3% now they are working with an iPad.

Sharing Work With Other Students
Before students used iPads 23.9% were sharing work with other students on a regular basis. This has increased to 62.7% of students sharing their work on a regular basis with other students.

It is clear that the use of iPads in lessons very quickly has a positive influence on students’ collaboration and sharing of their work.

Working Independently
66.6% of students rated independent learning in lessons as good or better before using an iPad. This rose to 79.6% of students rating it as good or excellent with the introduction of iPads at school.

Time in Lessons to Explore and Develop Your Ideas
This saw a shift from only 15.8% of students saying they were given time in lessons on a regular basis to 94% of students saying they now are given time to explore and research their own ideas on a regular basis in lessons.

The range of tools in the iPad and the speed with which they can be accessed during a sequence of learning activities means that teachers can plan to hand more responsibility to students for aspects of their learning during lessons.

Completion of Homework
64.5% of students rated the completion of homework as good or better before they used an iPad, compared to 74.7% of students since having an iPad.

Feedback from Teachers
Feedback from teachers was rated as good or excellent by 52.9% of students before they had an iPad. Since students have an iPad, 66.9% of students now rate the feedback from teachers a good or better.

In the first ten weeks, teachers experimented with a range of vehicles for setting and assessing homework. These increases in student responses mark the first steps in the journey to dramatically improve and personalise feedback to students in order to accelerate their achievement. 

Sharing Work With Parents
Only 15% of students were sharing their work on a regular basis with parents. Since the introduction of iPads 55.6% of students are now sharing their work with parents on a regular basis.

One of the key aims of the Hove Park iPad learning Transformation Project is to bring parents into closer contact with their children’s learning. This early gain in the frequency of sharing work at home gives us a good platform to build on as we begin to share our lesson materials on iTunes U in the coming months.

Resources/articles/apps/videos

1) iPads Improve Classroom Learning, Study Finds

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2013/12/131210-ipad-learning-education-space-science/

2) Improving feedback in a 1:1 environment.

http://newtechtimeline.com/2013/10/20/improving-student-feedback-in-a-11-environment/

3) Explain Everything for superb student feedback

http://ictevangelist.com/explain-everything-superb-student-feedback/

4) Establishing A Twitter Routine In Your Classroom

http://www.teachthought.com/social-media/establishing-a-twitter-routine-in-the-classroom/

5) Why Innovate?

http://dedwards.me/2014/01/28/why-innovate-2/

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iPad bumper edition

Good Practice at Upton :

A positive response from Upton Parents on iPads for learning December 2014

My child feels more motivated to work, with their iPad than without it:

IMG_1135Year 7 Parents: 89% Strongly agree/agree

Year 8 Parents: 92% Strongly agree/agree

What the parents said: He loves it. It really taps into what kids are into and so encourages him to want to learn more. It’s easier to research topics, and present in a more interesting way. She is able to research and find out things for herself at home. If I don’t know the answer we can find it together. (Work by Jemma Year 7)

The iPad is helping my child to improve the quality of their work.

Year 7 Parents: 87french% Strongly agree/agree

Year 8 Parents: 89% Strongly agree/agree

What the parents said: He can add more detail, spell check his work, use the online dictionary, thesaurus and include pictures. She has a world of knowledge at her finger tips so she is able to put a lot of detail into her work – an extension of what she learnt in school. (Work by Jessica Year 8)

 

My child is making better progress with the iPad than without it.

Year 7 Parents: 83% Strongly agree/agree  history

Year 8 Parents: 88% Strongly agree/agree

What the parents said: He is more motivated so he is working harder and so making greater progress. Probably because it is more convenient than using different books and of course technology is a major part of life today.The speed of what she is learning has increased. Teachers explain to her how to improve on Showbie and so she can improve her work before the next lesson. (Work by Dan Year 7)

I think that my child’s achievement has improved since they received their iPad.

nateYear 7 Parents: 82% Strongly agree/agree

Year 8 Parents: 86% Strongly agree/agree

What the parents said: His grades have improved because he is more motivated. She is able to work on her own and so has improved at a faster rate. Rosie is improving in most lesson because she using her ipad. My child is keen to undertake the challenge of using the new technology to work with.

 

I feel that my child is able to work more effectively with the iPad than without it.

Year 7 Parents: 86% Strongly agree/agree

Year 8 Parents: 89% Strongly agree/agree

What the parents said: He enjoys learning now. The world at her finger tips! I think my daughter loves working on her iPad. He can research independently. My child is more organised.

My child is able to work more with others with the iPad than without it.friends

Year 7 Parents: 88% Strongly agree/agree

Year 8 Parents: 92% Strongly agree/agree

What the parents said: He can share work using air drop. She can share ideas using iMessage and email. The little video’s they produce from team work are really good. He tells me that he shares his work with others in class. I have seen examples of his work in the ipad news letter too. He also showed me some apps that he uses with a partner.

I am happy for my child to use the iPad regularly in their learning.

Year 7 Parents: 97% Strongly agree/agree

Year 8 Parents: 95% Strongly agree/agree

What the parents said: It is why we chose Upton High. Helps with their learning alongside written work & books. I think it makes learning more exciting, accessible and appropriate for the time we live in. I am happy for iPad to be used along side traditional teaching rather than a replacement. (Work by Dan Year 7)

Brain food:

  • A study from the National Literacy Trust and Pearson, published last month, suggested that touchscreen computers were particularly useful in helping boys and poorer pupils to learn to read.
  • It showed children in poorer households were particularly likely to read on touchscreen computers rather than printed books.
  • Another study from Ofcom last year showed how tablets have spread quickly within families with children. About 70% of five to 15-year-olds had access to a tablet at home.

Exposure to technology – a timeline:

IMG_0001

IMG_0019 copy

 

Article of the week:

15 Unique and Creative Ways to Use iPads in the Classroom by teachingwithipad.org (1 by me JKE!):

Here are some great new ideas to use your iPad in your classroom. The iPad, as we all know, is a great tool for education. We are hoping that you can use at least a few of these new and creative ideas.

1. Use your iPad as a document camera with the Stage Interactive Whiteboard and Document Camera.

With this app, and the help of a dedicated, or DIY, mount you can use your iPad as a document camera, annotate over anything you set under the camera, and even record what you show. Got another $10? Make your own microscope attachment for up to x175 magnification!

 Stage Interactive (1)

2. Review almost any academic topic using the Quizlet app (FREE).

Quizlet is a completely free resource that allows you to create flashcards for your students. Interactive games can also be done on the web. Project them for great review as a class! An optional Teacher account with extra features is available. Students can also practice individually at home for review for upcoming tests. You do not necessarily need the app, as it is a web-based service as well. Run it straight from your browser.

flash cards

quizlet

3. Use your iPad as a “game show” – style soundboard.

Play review games (with the aide of technology or without) and use special sound effects in your class using apps such as Game Show Sound Board.

game show

4. Build Posters using great photography apps like Diptic, Pic Collage and Over.

Have lots of interesting photos to share? Stitch them together using these apps, print them off to display in your classroom! Your students can create poster projects containing multiple images displaying what they have learned. Students and teachers can then add text using the Over app.

photo

5. Use your iPad as a music playlist manager.

Do you sing and/or listen to a lot of songs in class? You can choose to use iTunes to create playlists but did you know that you can easily create playlists in YouTube as well? Find essentially any song you wish on YouTube and play it on your iPad! Better yet, use apps such as Musi to stream your music if you have a strong wifi signal, orInstatube to save your music for offline viewing/listening.

you tube

6. Use your iPad as a classroom management tool

Use visuals on your projected iPad with the app Silent Light ($3.99).

The iPad will monitor noise levels and you as a teacher can set what level is appropriate for each particular activity. Set a goal for points your class to achieve to earn rewards.

traffic light

7. Create a special effects movie with the Doink green screen app.

Recreate your favorite Sci-Fi movies or your own mini blockbuster with the aid of a green sheet and this innovative app. Film your scene in front of a green screen, then layer your background on top if it to create an awesome special effect! Export your video to the Camera Roll and it is ready to be edited further or combined with more clips in iMovie. You might also want to take a look at the Action Movie FX app.

green screen app

8. Record Podcasts with USB Mics.

The iPad is a great multimedia device, but the microphone is not of the highest quality for recording professional sounding audio in video or for podcasts. However, with the help of Apple’s Camera Connection Kits, you can connect good quality USB mics and other peripherals to use with your iPad.

camera connector

9. Create multimedia eBooks with Book Creator.

One of the best uses for the iPad in education is digital storytelling apps, and they don’t come much better than Book Creator for iPad. Over 3 million multimedia eBooks have been created with just this app! You can add text, images, video, audio and more. Choose from over 50 fonts, draw your own illustrations, and send your finished product to iBooks, Dropbox, or share by email. Try it out for free!

book creator

10. Let the iPad choose!

Ever have trouble deciding who gets to answer in class? I still see teachers with a can of 25 names on Popsicle sticks with their students names on them. The iPad can choose names randomly.

Also, Do you have difficulty choosing people for group projects? There are various apps that can do this for you. Check out Pick Me! ($1.99), which can keep a standing record of correct and incorrect responses that the students give. The app is able to choose, based on their individual percentages of correct answers, leveled, random and balanced groups.

Read: Let the iPad choose! It’s the fair way!

choose

11. Capture metacognition with Explain Everything.

We talk a lot about differentiated instruction, but not enough about differentiated assessment. Using Explain Everything ($2.99), students can show you (and tell you!) what they know in a way that works for them. Explain Everything is a screencasting app that allows students to “annotate, animate, narrate, import and export almost anything to and from almost anywhere.” Whether students demonstrate their understanding of a math concept, summarizing skills, or phonemes, Explain Everything allows you to capture students’ thoughts while viewing their work.

explain1

explain2

12. Share your students’ learning experiences with families and other schools using Instagram.

Looking for an easy way to share your classroom with families and other educators? JoinInstagram (for free)! Using the iPad’s camera, you can capture photos and videos to quickly post to Instagram, where families and other educators can celebrate your students’ learning right along with you.

Read: How to use Instagram’s great features without its social sharing issues

instagram

13. Augment reality with Layar or Aurasma.

Augmented reality can change the way your students see the world by offering additional digital information to real objects that can only be seen via apps like Layar (free) orAurasma (free). Post a blank map or timeline, where teachers and students can add different types of multimedia content that can be viewed depending on age, ability, and/or curriculum.

augment

augment1

14. Collaborate with other classrooms using video conferencing and Subtext.

We should never let our students think that their classroom is just the four walls around them. It is essential that students know that the world is their classroom, and the iPad is a great way for students to connect and collaborate with students anywhere in the world. Whether students video conference with FaceTime or Skype (both free) to discuss a book in they read together in Subtext (a social reading app), or to do a Mystery Skype, the iPad opens doors to collaborative learning experiences for students of all ages.

Read: Use Facetime in class.

mystery skype

15. Look at good practice in our school. This one is by me. Click on the link below to see examples on uptoni:

https://uptoni.wordpress.com/

Recommended Reads

1) iPad in Education For Dummies by Sam Gliksman

It′s easy to bring the incredible iPad experience to your classroom today! The iPad is a natural fit for education in the 21st century, and this straightforward, full–color guide shows you just how to deploy it effectively in your educational institution. From understanding how iPads can be used for different learning styles to managing idownloadPad content and classroom use, finding the apps to complement your curriculum, creating interactive lessons, and beyond, author Sam Gliksman, a sought–after consultant on integrating technology in schools, answers all your questions. Helps teachers and administrators see how to use iPads effectively in different grades, classroom settings, and curriculum levels Explains iPad′s built–in media features and the importance of multimedia in modern education Explores iPad best practices, tools, and apps for a successful iPad program in your school Shows how the iPad can be used as a valuable tool for research, collaboration, communication, creativity, and discovery Provides tips and guidance on keeping information updated, managing content, and taking advantage of the iPad as a learning tool iPad in Education For Dummies is your guide to using the world’s most popular tablet to inspire and educate your students in a whole new way.

2) Top 10 UK education Blogs:

The full list: (last Updated 15/01/2014) – click here to visit the page.

  1. @TeacherToolkit
  2. @Learning Spy
  3. @headguruteacher
  4. @HuntingEnglish
  5. Learning from my mistakes: an English teacher’s blog
  6. @johntomsett
  7. Scenes From The Battleground
  8. Geoff Barton’s Pick ‘n’ Mix
  9. ClassroomTM
  10. Tabula Rasa

Useful links/videos/resources

1) Free online textbooks from top private school. Read the full article by clicking on the link below:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-30832938

2) Used by thousands of teachers worldwide, Teacher Guide to iPad includes over 500 ideas for lesson activities using iPad across all age groups. 200 Video tutorials walk through apps, ideas and skills in small, manageable sections. Plus pupil work examples, labelled guides and links to resources that have all been tried and tested in school. Click on the link below.

http://www.ilearn2.co.uk/ipadteachers.html

3) ipadteachers.org is a website where teachers and education professionals can share ideas about making the most of the use of iPads in the classroom. Hosted by Hove Park School in Brighton, England, our site aims to share the experiences of our teachers as well as providing links to interesting blogs and articles from around the world. We also welcome direct contributions from any teachers who are excited about the positive impact iPads can make to learning.

http://ipadteachers.org/

4) Ideas and resources for using the ipad for learning

http://teachingwithipad.org/

5) Developing digital leaders

http://www.educate1to1.org/digital-leaders-ipads-school-education-11/

Digital workflows, feedback and progress

 Good Practice at Upton :

Developing literacy skills:

stone coldYear 9 students are currently reading Stone Cold by Robert Swindells. Students have been inspired by the gritty reality of this novel about a homeless teenager called Link. One sentence in the novel seemed to really be the turning point for the two groups – ‘I found  a doorway’. Students based their descriptive writing and poetry around the idea of what it would be like to be 16, homeless and sleeping in a doorway for the first time. Their completed work has been phenomenal.

IMG_1956

Display produced by Miss Farnin’s class and inspired by Stone Cold.

IMG_1951IMG_1952

Michael, Kirsty, Joe and Tayiba are so proud of the work they have produced and have used the feedback they received to improve and make progress.

IMG_1957

The work produced by Tayiba and the feedback she received.

IMG_2002

Hardworking students and proud Headteacher Mrs Dixon, 2nd Deputy Mr Keegan and School Governor Mr Ivison.

Edmodo used by Mrs Critchley

Edmodo is a great way to communicate with your students.  You can set homework, write a class blog, share resources and much more.  Students create their own accounts using their school email address and they will receive notifications when you write a post.  For students who have their school email connected to their phone or iPad, the notification is instant.  As a form tutor, this is a great way to communicate with your form and keep them up-to-date with all school messages.   See below

IMG_1571

Digital workflows and feedback to enhance and monitor feedback

This work was used as part of a workshop at the SSAT National Conference December 5th 2014

Art – Acting on feedback before the next lesson by Miss French

art 2

Drama – Feedback and how to improve by Mr Tierney

Drama 1Drama 2

English – Feedback and discussing literature by Mrs Johns

English 1

Geography – WWW & EBI by Mrs Mitchell

Geography

 Brain Food

Keep Calm and purposeful

How to measure progress over time:

This supports how we monitor progress at Upton by Chester

Progress Over TIme @TeacherToolkit

 Safe & Simple Blogs for Your Students

Over 5 million K-12 students have a voice at Kidblog. We’re trusted by teachers around the world. Set up your class for free in 20 seconds – no student email addresses, no ads.
http://kidblog.org/home/

Improve student literacy using iPads

Improve your vocab! Mess with your friends’ faces! It’s a unique, silly and – believe it or not – educational two-player game! The most fun way ever to improve or revise your language skills – a rapid-fire battle of comic-style, face-mangling quizziness.
https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/vocab-battle-sat-languages/id396143063?mt=8

 Article of the week: 

An article by the ictevangelist which mirrors what we are doing are Upton by Chester

DiRTy Technology – how to use technology to affect impact on feedback

‘Dedicated Improvement and Reflection Time’. Championed by @jackiebeere in many of her brilliant booksand by top bloggers such as Didau (he even has DIRT archives) and Quigley. Rewriting the wheel is not what i’m about here – what I do want to do though is talk about how I’m embedding DIRT in to my classroom making use of technology.

Yes, it is as Quigley recommends:

Dirt sections

So how are we doing it?

The simple answer is ‘Showbie’. With a Showbie Pro account we are able to set all the assignments we want for all of our classes and make great use of the tool to facilitate all of the different aspects of the feedback model.

Focused

Students have time in lesson to reflect upon their feedback which appears in their submitted assignment folder. As Showbie is on a simple level a repository for files, you can put any number of different types of feedback in there, from an annotated Word file (which is what I do mostly with a section on WWW and EBI among other sections, such as student reflection) to a full on Explain Everything feedback video.

Modelled and scaffolded

I’m modelling and scaffolding their responses in a number of ways. Firstly I’ve got a feedback template. Nothing sexy, it’s just a simple template (not even made by me) in Word format which has space for the date of the feedback, their target minimum grade / level, something which states what their piece of work is, a WWW (what went well) section, an EBI (even better if) section and a student response section. It looks like this when you screenshot it from your iPad:

dirt3

 

For those staff who like things a bit more analogue, I did however design a label which can go in to books which is being used as a sticker by some colleagues in their lessons:

Feedback sheet yellow

Targeted

Here, as Quigley rightly points out, DIRT and feedback are essential bedfellows. I am basically aiming to ensure that the feedback that students get is thorough, and taking on board the writings of John Hattie, I am to ensure that the feedback is timely. John Hattie writes that feedback should be:

  • Just in time
  • Just for them
  • Just for where they are in their learning
  • Just what they need to move forward

…and the technology helps me to do that. Showbie lets me know when work has been submitted, when students have responded to feedback, developed their work, so forth and so on. It’s great!

Oral

I love giving oral feedback. So do lots of my students, particularly those who are dyslexic. I like it because I can use technology, particularly with apps such as Explain Everything (read more here), to give much more detailed feedback than I would be able to do just through handwriting or typing along. Showbie enables me to take the feedback to the next level. In Showbie I can record voice notes (as seen in the feedback pane below). What I ask students to do then (just like with the verbal feedback sticker mentioned by Chocotzar in her great post about marking) is write up their next steps and their understanding of the feedback given, just within a note, actually within that assignment within Showbie itself. Magic!

dirt2

Involves peers

This is where I think the power of mobile technology really helps with the feedback. I have been asking for students with their iPads to not only ask their peers to give them feedback to feed forward towards developing their work and critiquing (whilst been kind, specific and helpful – thanks!) but I’ve also been asking the students to ask their parents to give some verbal feedback on the school work of their children. Not many have done it yet – but some are.

Transparent

What I like about it all is that not only is it giving the students the opportunity to reflect upon their work; to think about the feedback they’ve been given in a timely fashion, but it’s also giving students the opportunity to do so anywhere.

I realise that Showbie isn’t the only way this can be done, but for me – it’s a great win. If you’d like to find out more about Showbie and its many more features than I’ve talked about here, download the app and have a play around – it’s free (although note that not all features are free and would involve the purchase of a Pro account).

Recommended Reads

1. The Glass Wall: Why Mathematics Can Seem Difficult

What makes mathematics understandable? What makes mathematics confusing? Could something be wrong with the way mathematics is taught? glass wallFollowing his years of studying human intellectual accomplishments such as language, reading, writing, thinking, and learning, Frank Smith now turns his critical lens on the teaching and learning of mathematics. In The Glass Wall, Smith helps us to understand why some people find the world of mathematics so compelling while others find it so difficult. This original volume examines two different worlds: the physical world (our familiar world of objects and events) and the world of mathematics(a completely different domain of experience), and the glass wall that can exist between them. Smith argues that, because the language used to talk about these two worlds is not the same, many people find themselves behind the glass wall, on the outside looking in.

2. Outstanding Teaching: Engaging Learners

At the end of every week many teachers leave school exhausted. In an era when responsibility for exam results lies with them and not their students it’s time to redress the balance so that students take more of the responsibility for their learning and progress. A class can be skilled and motivated to learn without a teacher always having to lead. Engaging learners in this wengaging learnersay unpicks intrinsic motivation, the foundation that underpins a productive learning environment and helps to develop independent learning, creativity and improved behaviour management. Based on five years of intensive research through Osiris Education’s award-winning Outstanding Teaching Intervention programme, during which the authors have trained more than 500 teachers to teach over 1,300 lessons in schools nationwide, this book is packed with proven advice and innovative tools developed in these successful outstanding lessons. Written in the same humorous, thought-provoking style with which they both teach and train, Andy and Mark aim to challenge all who teach, from NQTs to seasoned professionals, to reflect on their day-to-day practise and set an agenda for sustainable teacher and leadership improvement. Outstanding Teaching: Engaging Learners was short listed for Educational Resources best Educational Book Award 2013.

 

3claxton. What’s the Point of School?: Rediscovering the Heart of Education

What’s the Point of School? takes the reader beyond the sterile debates about City Academies and dumbed-down exams in order to reveal the key responsibility of education today: to create students who enjoy learning. With their emphasis on stressful exams and regurgitation of information, Guy Claxton claims that schools are currently doing more harm than good, primarily making students fear failure. Instead, schools must encourage students to develop their curiosity, ask stupid questions, and think for themselves. He explains scientists’ latest theories about how the human brain learns, and reveals some of the core habits needed to create a strong, supple mind. He then goes on to explain how these are already being successfully implemented in some schools – all without chucking out Shakespeare or the Periodic Table. Professor Guy Claxton is one of the UK’s foremost thinkers on creativity, learning and the brain in both business and education. He is Professor of the Learning Sciences at the University of Bristol, and the author and editor of over 20 books on learning and creativity.

Useful links

1. Resourceful YouTube Channels for Teachers and Educators

http://edtechreview.in/trends-insights/insights/1686-resourceful-youtube-channels-for-teachers-and-educators

2. Free PDF to PowerPoint converter

http://educationaltechnologyguy.blogspot.co.uk/2014/12/free-pdf-to-powerpoint-converter.html?m=1

3. 8 apps to improve workflow between student and teacher

http://www.educate1to1.org/8-apps-give-seriously-rigorous-workflow/?utm_content=bufferd4b26&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer

4. Developing student independence through the use of iPads

http://www.pedagoo.org/developing-student-independence-through-the-use-of-ipads/
5.Universal skills
http://usergeneratededucation.wordpress.com/2014/12/06/universal-skills-all-learners-should-know-how-to-do/