Developing strategies and resources in order to improve student progress with a specific emphasis on middle ability boys

Our Policy

“A school is only as good as its teachers. It is teachers who make the difference to children’s life chances…the quest to get more good and outstanding teachers in front of children is a key challenge for all school leaders.” (Perfect Teacher-Led CPD, 2014). To develop our staff we need to continue to get:

  • teachers excited about teaching.
  • teachers talking about teaching.
  • teachers planning and evaluating their teaching together.
  • teachers observing and learning from each other.
  • teachers sharing what works with each other.

“It takes 10,000 hours to become an expert” (Malcolm Gladwell). For teachers this would equate to 10 years teaching. Teachers tend to plateau after 2-3 years. (S. Allison). If most teachers stop getting better after 2-3 years, whereas they should be developing their skills over 10 years to reach expert level, then how do we address the professional development deficit? We need to give staff a range of CPD opportunities that will engage, enthuse and motivate them.

In a survey carried out with our staff for the year 2013-14:

  1. How useful did you find the TEEP training this year? 89% (61 people) found it at least useful. 11% (8 people) did not. This suggests that the majority of the staff value the training.
  2. How useful did you find coaching? 72% (18 people) found it useful. 28% (7 people) did not. Only staff who took part in coaching answered this question. This means that on the whole it was successful and those who did not find it useful either do not feel they need to be coached or need a different coach. It is important that all staff have access to a coach if they want coaching, in order for them to develop further.
  3. How useful did you find the Swap Shop activity? 83% (57 people) found it at least useful. 17% (12) did not. This suggests that the majority of the staff value the sharing good practice in this way.
  4. In the next academic year would you like to:
  5. Get involved in coaching: Just under 6% (4 people) of respondents said they wanted to do this.
  6. Prepare TEEP resources for your department. 61% (42 people) of respondents said they wanted to do this. This is a clear indicator that staff want more time to develop resources.
  7. Continue with opportunities for whole school sharing of resources and ideas. 54% (37 people) said they wanted to do this. Again, this supports the sharing of good practice through swap shops, speed dating and TEEP PEEPS.

From this survey the aims of our school’s CPD are as follows:

Aims:

  • To improve Teaching and learning by embedding TEEP further.
  • To embed e-learning through iPad training for teachers of Years 7 and 8.
  • To ensure that all staff have access to a coach.
  • To give staff time to carry out individual action research which will help develop pedagogy and practice.
  • To give staff opportunities to share good practice.

In terms of an Ofsted judgment, the importance of using CPD to improve the quality of teaching in a school is clear. The 2014 School Inspection Handbook suggests that inspectors will assess ‘how professional development has improved the quality of teaching’, ‘the extent to which leaders’ monitoring of teaching has identified needs and provided targeted pedagogical guidance and support for teachers’ and the nature and impact of performance management’ (Ofsted, 2014:13) In terms of appraisal, schools are expected to:

  1. Set clear objectives for all teachers relevant to their career stage and linked to The Teachers’ Standards.
  2. Put in place appropriate CPD to support teachers with achieving these objectives.
  3. Monitor and evaluate the impact of this CPD and the progress made towards meeting the objectives.

What we said we were going to do: Inset day 21/11/14

Click to enlarge the slides

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This is what we produced

Also look at previous posts with excellent examples of resources shared by Upton staff.

English

One word responses by Mrs McGregor

This powerpoint would be suitable for consolidation of prior learning, and task setting. It requires one-word responses to each slide which could be shouted out (!), or taken round-the-class-without-hesitation, or by no-hands random name selection etc. It includes picture and moving-image stimuli for the boyish “stadium” task. See an examples below.

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Click the link to download the full powerpoint: Descriptive writing do’s don’ts

News paper reports by Mr Crozier:

Media Non-Fiction:

Prepare for learning:Role play activity. Students provided with muted video of Usain Bolt race from London 2012. Students then use their iPad’s to record commentary. Focus here upon using adjectives and adverbs.

Agree Learning Outcomes: Students highlight key stylistics features from newspaper report upon race. Use this to create personalised success criteria for producing a report.

Present New Information: Students create pic-collage of key words and terminology to be included in report.

Construct Meaning: Slow writing activity. Students given strict guidelines about parameters of opening paragraph in order to guide effective construction.

Apply to Demonstrate: Students then complete their article.

Review: Students use own success criteria in order to review success and purple pen their work.

Social Media and middle boys Produced by Mrs Johns, Miss McKevitt and Mr Waite:

This is a lesson aimed at middle ability Year 9 boys, using social media and current trends to inspire them.

Prepare for learning:What do these words have in common: hashtag, selfie, YOLO, bae, like? Which of these might be the odd one out?

Agree Learning Outcomes:To explore, discuss and analyse the impact of social media on the way we communicate.

Present New Information: Ask the question, which is the most commonly used word by children for 2015. Read the hashtag article in ‘The Guardian’ article if set 1 and ‘BBC News’ version if in set 2.Discuss what you think is going on in the video? Play Katy Perry WhatsApp version without sound. See if you can work out what the video is/ where it’s from. Discuss the impact of social media- is it easy to comprehend?

Construct Meaning:Look at an example of social media and its impact on spoken English e.g. WhatsApp, Facebook, Twitter, kik.

Apply to Demonstrate:How do we communicate using different social media apps? What are pros and cons of WhatsApp, Twitter etc. Feedback findings to rest of the class

Review:Write their own sentence(s) about the impact social media has had on spoken English, using the features of social media communication. E.G. Write a sentence about what they have learned today, using hashtags.

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Click on the links to download the resources: Lesson 6 (Hashtags) Social Media Grid Social Media Screens

Mr Doherty:

English and reading. Getting boys to read for a length of time is a challenge:

  1. 30 second sound bite
  2. Create a hero/villain character profile – this could be considered alongside. Interpretations and the importance of factors
  3. 3 fascinating facts from this book(or topic/chapter etc

Geography

Ideas from the Geography team

Geography tarsia

Geography Tarsia

 

Flooding wordmix: Click to download: Flooding wordmix (2)

 

Flooding word mix

 

Click to download coastal features match up cards: Coast Features Match Up Cards

Kinaesthetic activities by Miss Connor

Attached are photos of my Middle boys ideas. The focus is on kinaesthetic: use of playdoh, Lego, making pop-ups and card sort competitions.

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History

Mr Petty

He started his reflections on middle boys by pondering what is the problem.

  • Understanding?
  • Disinterest?
  • Lazy?

APT

 

The solution was he did a rough draft paragraph and selected the best (e.g. examples that were approaching the correct standard – didn’t need to be perfect) and used this to Single/Pair/Share. A simple solution to get progress from one lesson to the next. He chose not to share writing which was below standard. Good AfL benefits middle boys. The examples were used to give the criteria of a good answer. It aims to motivate and inspire some of the bottom half of the class who may be lazy/disaffected to aim higher with work. This is an example of the good students work that was shared in the class.

Miss Main:

Using jigsawing:

  • Students enter expert groups
  • They then move to new groups to share knowledge
  • They then return to expert groups to explain what they found

A better explanation can be found here

http://www.learningspy.co.uk/learning/the-expert-approach-to-group-work/

Kids learn enormous amounts from this activity: it develops skills of oracy and of turn taking; they also learn predominantly from each other. Your are not involved in any way other than as a facilitator, and as such, it is a serious, über-constructivist, Ofsted pleaser.

Phil Beadle[i]

Mrs Vianello:

  1. Empathy skills use your senses to describe a source
  2. Particularly good for challenging sensitive topics – Good for engagement
  3. This activity forces students to slow down when looking at a source with depthAVI

Target circle: agree to disagree. Which facts would you place in which parts of the circle. This can be used as an alternative method of essay planning.

AVI2

 

Mr Mulhall:

Set the room up into the number of groups needed. Give the students an information pack with details from 5 aspects of learning. Then move around the room and place the piles into the correct table and return to your home table. Once students have all of the sources for their topic students turn that information into a mind map, they then can attach this to an exam question. This can also be used for revision.

SML

Miss Suter:

Moving middles boys from a 5 – 6. Many middle boys don’t like writing, and some of her class are scared of attempting higher level thinking. Focus has been on variation and chunking of activities, appealing to a range of learning styles.

The first resource is my Factory Act lesson which I have shard with you before. The second is my introduction to slavery lesson. The pictures on the slide are cut up into cards but can also be distributed as one big A3 sheet. I’ve also included an extension task and the writing boxes though to save paper the activity could easily be done in books. Both lessons worked well.

Slavery lesson – describe the pictures, explain context, how could these pictures be used by a supporter. The scaffolding behind the question allowed them to reach high level skills stealthily.

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Maths

Mr B. Jones: Ball pit race

I have two boxes, each containing plastic play balls numbered 1 to 50. Classes are split into two teams, sometimes by gender and sometime just a random split. Questions are posed to the team, and not only do they have to find the answer, they then have to find the correct ball in the ball pit.

On occasions I have just used one set to play a game. Again they are split into two teams and each team member has a number. I call out a pair of numbers and give them a question. They then have to find the correct ball. A point is awarded to the team whose player has found the ball first.

Click to download Ball pit race

Modern Foreign Languages

Strategies and resources for motivating middle to lower ability boys:

  1. Information gathering from posters around the classroom. Students have to work in groups and one member at a time moves around the room to find the relevant information and then relays it to the rest of the group. The first team to find all the information wins.
  2. Bingo cards, laminated cards with foreign language questions or information. Students take it in turns to play the role of ‘bingo caller’ to test their knowledge.
  3. Lotto sentences to learn new vocabulary and sentence structures – a more complicated version of bingo!
  4. Word dominoes, students must match the image to the language.
  5. Teacher made online quizzes on websites such as quizlet.com. Scatter games which are timed and encourage students to compete.
  6. Game of slam on the IWB, images are displayed and the screen is frozen. Two students come to the board and the winner is the first one to correctly ‘slam’ the image the teacher says in the target language.
  7. Using mini whiteboards to extend sentences or write draft sentences that students can hold up to the teacher for immediate, regular feedback and praise.
  8. Include factual information e.g students have to create a weekly school canteen menu the target language. Each item of food and drink has a nutritional value and students are given parameters to organise their menu. Students are also given prices and have to stick to a budget.
  9. Grand national plenary slide. The horse will move forward if the student correctly answer the question. Promotes challenge.
  10. Reading comprehensions, number each line of text and question students on the content. The numbers help the boys to focus and encourage them to read the text.
  11. Pictionary on mini whiteboards to learn new vocabulary. Teacher says the sentence and students draw the image or item of vocabulary.

Music

Composition is like a car by Miss C. Thompson:

This resource is aimed at middle boys who are taking GCSE music and it focuses on structuring composition – “Composition is Like a Car”.

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Click to download Year 10 Composition

Name that note by Miss Stevenson:

The musical stave is laminated are so are the notes, which can be moved anywhere on the stave and  are stuck on with blue tack. The staves are stuck up around the room and pupils get into groups of 4/5. I write 5 letters on the board and taking it in turn each member has to put the note in the correct place on the stave. Once all five notes have been placed, one member of the group has to play the notes on the keyboard and try to work out what the piece of music is from the first 5 notes. The first group to place the notes in the correct place and correctly identify the song gets a point. The first group to get three points wins.

Design and Technology

To help raise the attainment of middle and lower boys we have done several things as a department

KS4: Started the coursework earlier – this is allows us more quality interim assessment time and student more time to do DIRT.

KS4:  Coursework choices are fewer and more focussed – resourcing and support materials can be better planned.

KS3&4: Where students are struggling, teachers are asked to ‘bridge the gap’ for them – this allows them not to fall behind whilst continuing to make progress – attendance at after school club may be insisted on.

KS4: Where students are seriously struggling teachers are asked to provide them with a rigid framework for their coursework – attendance at after school club may be insisted on.

KS3&4: Exemplar materials are used regularly so that students can view the standards they are trying to achieve.

KS3&4: Some students are provided with individual assistance by our DT Technician.

KS3&4: We have produced Key terms lists and definition so that students can make better progress with the annotation of their coursework.

A great template produced by Mrs Melville

Click to download: TEEP planning_template.potx (2)

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Religious Studies

Active learning by the RS team

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CPR traininf for middle boys

 

CPR training for middle boys 2

Click to download: RS strategies for middle boys

Science

Light from stars by Mr Caine:

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Click to download: ACI PPT basics for middle boys

SSSHWEET SWAP by Mrs Bradbury:

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Click to download the full powerpoint:EBR SWEET SWAP

Family Fortunes by Mrs Woodward:

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Click to download: Family fortunes KWO

Problem solving by Mrs Skutter:

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Click to download: KSC starter and plenary idea

Ideas researched by Mrs Rogers:

In verbal tennis the students develop skills of listening and responding to each other in pairs. In the first two films, the teacher introduces the task, then in each pair one student begins by naming an animal and the other student has to respond with another animal. The task then becomes more focused, the students have to listen more carefully and think of an animal that is related in some way. Click on the link to find out more:

www.pstt.org.uk/ext/cpd/argumentation/unit1-verbal_tennis.php

Listening triads. A useful structure for enabling students to discuss alternative positions, such as those portrayed in concept cartoons, is through students working in groups of three, or ‘listening triads’. The structure is inclusive, as each member of the group has an active role, it also provides an opportunity for students to ‘take turns’ and listen carefully to each other. The teacher can monitor the discussions by listening in to see how ideas are expressed and questioned. There is also a record of the discussion for the students to take forward. Click on the link to find out more:

www.pstt.org.uk/ext/cpd/argumentation/unit1-listening_triads.php

Models by Mr Bell:

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Click to download the powerpoint:MBE Middle Boys Models

Just a minute by Mr Rutter:

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Click to download: MRU Just a minute

Revision by Mr Skilling

Key Stage 3 revision Game.

1 .Each table of 3 or 4 are a team.

  1. Each team go through their exercise books and find a key word from the topic you’re revising.
  2. “Spokesperson” from the group comes to you at the front of the class and adds their keyword to your list. (AFL)
  3. Class are then given all the key words as a spelling test with the words going onto a mind map diagram. (AFL)
  4. Each group then picks a number from 1 to 10 from the list of the key words you’ve jumbled up.
  5. Depending on the key word chosen the group prepares a 3 min explanation of what the word means and explaining it with relevance to the lesson. They can use their ipad to prepare this. The “spokesperson” will then explain this to the class.
  6. All groups prepare a revision “Mind map” of all the information presented by the 10 groups.

I’ve tried this with a year 7 and 8 group and it went great, very useful for students. Middle attaining boys seem to respond well to this as they like the challenge aspect and being in control as the key words they generate determines the lesson content (within reason !!).  The benefit of you being in control of the key word list is you can add or amend this to cover the work you best think the students need.

Play your cards right by Ms Kam

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Click to download play your cards right mka

Grouping with cards by Mrs De Costacards

Use the playing cards to sort the pupils into groups for group work. You could either use pairs, groups of 4 (same number or same suit) For more able pupils I ask them to make their group up to a certain number

(make sure you sort the cards first so this works)  If odd numbers add in a joker and they can pick their own group.

Interactive graphs by Mr Warwick

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Click to download post it graphs MWA

Choice and challenge activities by Mr Gorman

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Click to download PGO C1-choice-and-challenge-activities

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Developing Middle Leaders, Coaching and Reflection

Good Practice:

In Upton:

At our Curriculum Leaders meeting on Monday Mrs Dixon emphasised the following:

The engine room of the school, middle leaders are heads of department or year, or leaders of whole-school areas such as Gifted and Talented or English as an Additional Language. They lead teams of teachers – turning the senior leadership’s strategy into outstanding classroom practice on a daily basis. High-performing middle leaders drive consistent teacher quality in their areas of responsibility through curriculum leadership, lesson observations, holding staff to account and developing staff. They also ensure consistency across the school by collaborating and challenging their fellow middle leaders, influencing whole-school behaviours through sharing, coaching and mentoring. As Russell Hobby (2012) says:

‘Middle leaders have more day-to-day impact on standards than headteachers. Middle leaders are, simply, closer to the action. Teachers’ and pupils’ experience of leadership comes most frequently from their middle leaders. And the essential work of curriculum planning, monitoring and developing teaching belongs with middle leaders.’ 

middle-leaders-brain1

In order to develop as a school we need a policy focused on developing a cadre of outstanding middle leaders with the skills to address within-school variation could become critical to closing the achievement gap. If middle leaders are to reduce within school variation, they need to pass two tests: the first is to drive consistently outstanding teaching within departments on a daily basis; and the second test is to work collaboratively across the school to ensure consistency between departments.

So what next?

Middle Leadership Support & Training Possibilities

Develop your Leadership Style, including:

  • Knowing what inspectors look for in outstanding middle leaders
  • Benchmarking and auditing your own strengths and weaknesses
  • Understand how to write, evaluate and make the best use of action plans

Elements of Outstanding Management, including:

  • Understanding the key differences between leadership and management which style and when it is appropriate
  • Preparing for Ofsted: know their criteria in your areas and their methods of scrutiny and evaluation

Reach Goals as a Team, including:

  • Dealing with difficult people
  • Leading observation and evaluations
  • Ensuring feedback is effective; structuring debriefs and appraising levels of progress
  • Know what makes your staff tick. Stimulate intrinsic motivators and understand the driving force of a sense of accountability and responsibility
  • Learn how to inspire others

(See How to be an Amazing Middle leader in the recommended reads below)

Mrs Dixon invited members of the group to offer suggestions on how to move forward. She also emphasised the need for consistency as discussed at our last Curriculum Leaders meeting:

  1. We agreed that we need to ensure that all staff follow consistent routines
  2. We agreed that when physically possible, students would line up. Standing behind the desk would be used to make sure that students are calm and ready to learn.
  3. There was total agreement that class dismissal needed to be calm and orderly because:
    • the health and safety of the students is paramount.
    • a disorderly dismissal is likely to have a negative impact on the next lesson
    • a disorderly dismissal has a negative effect on behaviour outside the classroom ie in corridors and travel routes
    • Consistent expectations regarding the way we do things here, the “Upton way” which students need to follow and be reminded of by all

When members of staff are not consistent the effectiveness of routines break down like the marbles falling when the sticks are pulled out in a game of Kaplunk:

Good Practice found on social media:

Top 10 UK Education Blogs 2015:

  1. @TeacherToolkit (ranked 1st in 2014)
  2. The Learning Spy (ranked 2nd in 2014)
  3. ICTEvangelist (new entry)
  4. Mr. P’s ICT Blog (new entry)
  5. The Whiteboard Blog (new entry)
  6. Scenes From The Battleground (up 1 place from 2014)
  7. Magical Maths (new entry)
  8. Learning with ‘e’s (new entry)
  9. ClassThink (new entry)
  10. Agility – Teaching Toolkit (new entry)

5 emails

Staff shout out:

So, why not set up a staff shout out board?
 Screen Shot 2015-04-07 at 11.08.12
  • Staff can share their thanks with their colleagues
  • Students can share their thanks with their teachers
Variations:
Set up a shout out board in your tutor group? Your GCSE/A Level class when others have learnt something from others?
Share and replace:
How It Works:Create a display- preferably by your staff photocopier?Have some plastic folders with a poster in stating-
‘PLACE YOUR RESOURCE HERE’
Next to those plastic folders- another poster stating-
‘PHOTOCOPY THE REshare and replaceSOURCE YOU WANT- REPLACE IT WITH ANOTHER?’Idea is that staff take a resource sheet that has been left there and simply replace it with another?
It really does work!Try it?Variations:

Use it in your dept?
Use it for revision?
Use it as an activity?

 Brain Food:

reflecting

gibbs

gibbs 2

Article of the week:

Coaching v mentoring: what works best for teachers? Teacher Andrew Jones explains the difference between coaching and mentoring, and how they suit different professional development needs.

Most teachers have been mentored at some point in their career – whether as a PGCE student, a newly qualified teacher (NQT) or after a promotion. Not many of us can say we have been “coached”, however. In fact, few of us would be able to give a clear definition or comparison of the two.

Coaching has become a buzzword in education over recent years and there are now numerous organisations promoting it in schools. Many training providers have cottoned on to this method of professional development, which has its roots in business leadership and as a psychological approach to performance in sport.

So, what is the difference between mentoring and coaching and how do they differ in teaching practice? In a nutshell, mentoring is a way of managing career transition whereas coaching is used whenever an individual feels the need to evaluate their professional capabilities, allowing for genuine continuous professional development (CPD).

Mentoring is a supportive, long-term relationship between an experienced mentor and their less experienced mentee. The idea is that the more senior mentor passes on knowledge and guidance as the mentee finds their feet in a new role.

In state education, mentoring is often structured around fulfilling standards, such as performance management targets, which provides plenty of documentary evidence of the mentoring and its outcomes. The process ends when the mentee is confident or capable enough to carry on with their duties without oversight.

Coaching, on the other hand, consists of peer-to-peer discussions that provide the person being coached with objective feedback on their strengths and weaknesses in areas chosen by them. While discussion is led by the coach, they ask questions that allow the professional seeking advice to reflect on their practice and set their own goals for improvement. This is the opposite of mentoring as the coach does not evaluate, judge or set targets, and the person being coached is in full control of the discussion. Unlike mentoring, coaching also gives the recipient more say on the direction of their professional development and encourages them to take more ownership of their CPD.

My experience of coaching has been extremely positive. Although sceptical, perhaps even cynical, at first, I have taken part in an extensive training programme on coaching led by my school’s lead performance coach. Coaching requires practice and observation by the trainer, as well as learning about the theory and practice. Within my training cohort, I coached and was coached by a number of colleagues, from experienced teachers to PGCE students.

The best thing about it was that it gave me the freedom to discuss my needs and wants openly; I wasn’t self-conscious when assessing my strengths and weaknesses and had a chance to properly think about the direction I want my career to go in. My colleagues who coached me kept the conversation focused, realistic and effective. Interestingly, some of the most productive sessions came from being paired up with colleagues in very different roles, such as the site manager. It was also important that my coach was not line managing or hierarchically senior to me to facilitate an open and confidential warts-and-all discussion.

That doesn’t mean coaching should be based on informal chats, however. It requires adequate training – giving objective feedback can be hard for the inexperienced. A coach has to be aware of their own views and any prejudices or preconceptions they might have about the person they’re helping. Theory, training and practice is needed so that you’re mindful of the nuances of language and can control any temptation to be judgemental.

Although mentoring remains an essential component of career development, especially when moving onto a new role or when assessing performance management, coaching can be a useful tool for encouraging an individual to take ownership of their own career path. It’s the ability to take ownership of CPD that really separates coaching from mentoring.

Andrew Jones is head of religious studies and sociology at Goffs School in Cheshunt, Hertfordshire. Find his department website and on Twitter as @GoffsRS.

Recommended Reads:

1) How to be an Amazing Middle Leader Paperback by Caroline Bentley-Davies

Today the myriad skills needed to be an amazing middle leader in schools can seem mind-boggling. What s more Middle Leaders are taking up the leadership reins after gaining experience for far fewer years than ever before. Whetamazing middle leaderher you are new to this role or are more experienced and aspiring to become a school leader, this book will give you the vital information you need in order to understand what is really important about your role and how to improve your key skills. This practical everyday guide covers: The skills of an amazing Middle Leader Developing excellence in your team and sharing good practice How to inspire others against the backdrop of the busy day to day running of a school Preparation for inspection Effective delegation Middle Leader challenges and next steps. Leading a team and getting the right things done An outstanding guide for an often neglected group.

2) Perfect Teacher-Led CPD (Perfect (Independent Thinking Press)) Hardcover by Shaun Allison

CPD

All successful schools have one thing in common they are full of brilliant teachers. This doesn`t happen by chance. If schools are to develop their teachers into first rate reflective and high performing practitioners, they need a varied and personalised CPD programme based on collaboration and sharing best practice. This book looks at how schools can move away from the one size fits all approach to CPD that still exists in a number of schools, to a CPD programme that will appeal to a range of teachers, unlocking the potential that exists within the staffroom. It`s about excellence from within. The book covers; leadership, school improvement, staff development, teaching excellence, growth mindsets and much more.

3) The Perfect Teacher Coach Hardcover by Jackie Beere

Many schools are now recognising that using a coaching model is the very best way to make sustainable improvements in the standard of teaching, performance management and learnicoachingng across all departments. The Perfect Teacher Coach presents a simple and practical guide to making coaching work well in your school, in order to deliver consistently high standards. This is ever more important with Ofsted increasing the number of lesson observations and ‘evaluations of teaching and learning’, providing a key performance indicator, alongside student outcomes. Everything you need to know about what coaching is and how it works is provided in this book. This includes details of various models of coaching and how to implement a successful model suitable for your school, training your coaches and ensuring you have a sustainable performance management process that really works.

 Resources:

1) Guidance: National Professional Qualification for Middle Leadership (NPQML)

https://www.gov.uk/national-professional-qualification-for-middle-leadership-npqml

2) Teaching leaders: Why middle leadership? | Teaching Leaders

3) Making the most of middle leaders to drive change in schools

http://www.theguardian.com/teacher-network/teacher-blog/2013/jul/02/middle-leaders-driving-change-school

4) Three keys to middle leadership

http://www.sec-ed.co.uk/best-practice/three-keys-to-middle-leadership

5) Leading coaching in schools

6) powerpoint on coaching

7) Coaching for Teaching and learning