Upton TEEP Peeps and marking tips

This week the Upton TEEP Champs and E learning facilitators (ELFs) delivered TEEP peeps to their colleagues. Below are the resources they used.

You are the examiner by Mr Caine and Mrs DeCosta

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Click on the links below to download the resources for this TEEP Peep:

You are the Examiner (1) You are the examiner worksheet – lower (1) You are the examiner worksheet – higher (2)

snakes and ladders template (2) Playing Cards Template (3)  blank_wordsearch_grid – Higher (1) blank_wordsearch_grid – Lower (1)

Growth Mindset by Mrs Critchley and Mr Keegan, with a lot of help from Mrs Connor – All Hallows  in Macclesfield

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Click on the links below to download the resources for this TEEP Peep:

TEEP PEEP 24.2.15 (2)

Revision Party presented by Miss McLean, Mrs Smale, Miss Summers and Mrs Melville

We can’t give you the option to download the presentation due to copyright issues, but I think you will get the idea.

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http://www.tutor2u.net/

Brain food

How technology in schools has changed over time: This is too difficult to read. Click on it to zoom in.

How-Technology-in-Schools-Has-Changed-Over-Time-Infographic (1)

 

How to reduce your workload – working smart: http://teachertoolkit.me/2015/02/28/the-5minworkloadplan-by-teachertoolkit-and-leadinglearner/

exemplar-5minworkloadplan

 Article of the week 

How to make marking more efficient: three new techniques for teachers

English teacher Andrew Tharby shares his advice on how to significantly reduce the time spent marking while improving the quality of feedback for students
Marking techniques
Andrew Tharby uses the gallery critique technique to help students receive detailed feedback from their peers. Photograph: Alamy

In Ted Hughes’ visceral first world war poem, Bayonet Charge, a young soldier experiences a moment of psychological clarity amid the chaos of the battlefield. He realises that he is running “Like a man who has jumped up in the dark and runs/Listening between his footfalls for the reason/Of his still running…” Sometimes, as I crouch over another seemingly endless pile of marking, Hughes’ words pop into my head. Why am I doing this? Is there any point to this madness?

Thankfully I am a secondary English teacher not a first world war soldier. Research confirms that feedback has a vital role in learning – take the evidence from the Education Endowment Foundation, for instance, or John Hattie’s table of influences on learning. But is it possible to significantly reduce the time spent marking while improving the quality of feedback students receive?

Three reasons lie behind my quest for a more efficient alternative. Firstly, marking saps a huge amount of time and energy that could be redirected into the research and reflection required to plan lessons that genuinely challenge and develop students’ learning. Secondly, the process feels depersonalised because it happens away from the classroom, making it difficult to maintain meaningful dialogue with students. Thirdly, by marking too regularly we create a culture of dependency, denying students the opportunity to develop important self-regulation strategies such as editing and proofreading.

The answer is not to ignore feedback, but to bring it to the forefront of everything we do in the classroom. Here are three ways you can do that in your classroom:

The five-minute flick

This is one of my favourite strategies. I check through a cross-section of books – five or six – to assess how students across a range of abilities performed in the previous lesson. If they have produced a piece of writing, I will begin the next class by showing an example from one student – typed up or photographed – and we critique it together. I guide the class through the editing process, staying focused on common misconceptions and weaknesses, so that we model an improvement together. Individuals then return to their own work and edit independently with this example in mind.

Gallery critique

In my experience, peer-assessment is fraught with problems; however well I train a class to do it proficiently, each student is at the mercy of the accuracy and commitment of the pupil next to them. Gallery critique draws on ideas from Ron Berger’s book, An Ethic of Excellence, and involves students moving around the classroom critiquing one another’s work using Berger’s “kind, specific, helpful” mantra, along with a plentiful supply of post-it notes. Not only do students receive detailed feedback from a number of peers, they also learn from reading each other’s work. I have written in depth about the strategy here.

Live marking

This also has huge potential. As the students are working, I call them up one-by-one to my desk. We discuss their work and l feedback both verbally and with symbols. If you are required by your school to demonstrate evidence of marking, a verbal feedback stamp can be very useful. I find this technique works best if the class is undertaking an extended written piece. I can see a whole class over two lessons and can differentiate the timing of my feedback, as some students need to be left to work independently for longer and others need to be steered on track much earlier. The strategy can be manipulated in a variety of ways depending on the subject and task.

Over time, I think it is possible to replace traditional marking with more efficient and effective alternatives. Marking books will never completely go away, but combined with approaches like the above it can become far less onerous.

Andrew Tharby is an English teacher at Durrington High school and has been teaching for eight years. He writes a blog about his classroom experiences, Reflecting English, and can be found on Twitter as @atharby.

The 5 minute marking plan by Teacher Toolkit

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Click on the link below for the presentation:

5 minute marking plan

Resources/articles/apps/videos

1) Mrs Humanities shows how she has developed DIRT even further within her department. Click on the link below:

https://mrshumanities.wordpress.com/2015/02/17/d-i-r-t-display/

2) IPAD TEACHERS – Video: 20 iPad Lesson Activities in 2 minutes.

https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v=698896713562094 

3) An interview with @TeacherToolkit: How To Become A Great Teacher by @WonderFrancis

http://wp.me/p2HFBD-3jr

4) Andy Griffith – Outstanding Teaching: A toolkit to succeed

5) Teaching Ideas and Resources

http://www.teachingideas.co.uk/

6) Teaching websites

http://www.teachingwebsites.co.uk/

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